"The argument over the 1894 flag has become as divisive as the flag itself and it’s time to end it."

Mississippi’s Gov. Tate Reeves says he’ll sign a bill that will remove the Confederate emblem from the state’s flag.

  • Backstory: Nearly thirty years after the end of the Civil War, the Confederate emblem was added to the state flag by white supremacists in the state’s legislature 1894. In 2001, Mississippi residents voted to keep the confederate symbol as part of the flag by a 60% majority.
  • Why Now? The flag has been a source of controversy for many years, but renewed efforts to change it gained speed after the May 25th killing of George Floyd. On Sunday, the legislature passed the bill. Now it heads to Gov. Reeves, who previously said the voters should decide whether to change the flag, but recently said he’ll sign it into law.
  • What’s Next? A nine-member commission will design a new flag, which will include the words “In God We Trust.”  Mississippi residents will vote on the commission’s design in November.
  • Why It Matters: Mississippi’s is the only state flag that incorporates the Confederate emblem.