Eats
Eats

FAST FOOD NATION?

More than 1 in 3 Americans eat fast food on a given day but many are also returning to more home-cooked meals.

How can we do both at the same time?

Eats

America’s Daily Diet

According to the latest CDC data:

  • Nearly 40% of adults eat fast food on a given day, which adds up to 11% of their average daily calories.
  • More than 1/3 of kids & teens eat fast food on a given day, which adds up to 12% of their average daily calories.
Eats

Why It Matters:

  • Fast-food restaurants employ 2% of U.S. workforce; average annual earnings: $26.1K
  • The CDC says the % of adults who eat fast food actually increases with income.
  • Eating fast food often contributes to obesity. 40% of adults, & 20% of kids & teens, are obese.
Eats

“America does still cook at home.”

David Portalatin, food analyst at research firm NPD Group, who says Americans eat 82% of our meals at home, more than we did a decade ago. Despite our consumption of fast food, NPD analysts shows Americans are eating out less; higher prices could be a factor. The rise in popularity of home meal kits could also be another reason for this - something fast-food restaurants like Chik-fil-A are trying out.
Eats

Part of the reason that fast food is so popular is because it's everywhere, and now many of the largest fast-food chains, like Subway, McDonald's, Burger King, Taco Bell, & Chick-fil-A, offer delivery - mostly from third parties like DoorDash or Grubhub.

view sources

Read
Eats

Dorcas Reilly
1926 – 2018

 

 

 

Celebrating the mother of “the mother of all comfort foods.”

 

 

 

Eats

Dorcas Reilly

Invented green bean casserole in 1955 while working for Campbell’s test kitchen creating 100s of recipes.

Tried several different versions, eventually nixing ingredients like celery, salt, & ham.

She said the appeal was in its simplicity, using everyday items most homes would have on hand.

Eats

Spilling the Beans

  • Originally called “Green Bean Bake.”
  • Reilly’s recipe needs only 5 ingredients: can of cream of mushroom soup, cooked green beans, milk, soy sauce & pepper. Pop it in the oven and toss some fried onions on top.
  • Campbell’s corporate kitchen’s #1 recipe, despite earning lower marks in internal rankings initially.
Eats

Love it or hate it, more than 60 years after the dish was created Reilly's legacy lives on as a Thanksgiving icon, served at 20M dinners annually. Her original, handwritten recipe card was donated to the National Inventors Hall of Fame by Campbell's in 2002.

view sources

Read
Eats

A Taste of Autumn

It’s officially Fall. Time to bring on pumpkin spice, well, everything. 

But don’t let those tastebuds fool you, there’s no pumpkin in that pumpkin spice.

Eats

How Did We Get Here?

First pumpkin spice reference dates back to 1796, but it was McCormick & Co. who brought it to store shelves in 1934.

McCormick uses cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg & allspice – not pumpkin.

Starbucks debuted its pumpkin spice latte in 2003, which is credited for the craze as we know it today.

Eats

“It represents a sense of goodness, natural abundance and old values that people think are good.”

Cindy Ott, author of “Pumpkin: The Curious History of an American Icon," on how Americans have used pumpkin pie & the spices in it to maintain connections to nature and our country's beginnings. America is the only country in the world that consumes pumpkin as a seasonal food or drink.
Eats

Peak Pumpkin Spice?

  • Americans spent $500M on pumpkin-flavored food in the last year, a new all-time high & up 15% vs. 2017.
  •  In 2005, pumpkin-flavored items were on 6% of U.S. restaurant menus. By 2015, the number grew to 14.5%, with the most in the northeast.
  • Fastest growing pumpkin-spiced product? Dog food. Seriously.
Eats

Starbuck's sprang forward this fall, debuting its famed pumpkin spice latte in late August. The #PSL drink, now in its 15th year, does include actual pumpkin puree and even has its own Twitter account (@TheRealPSL) boasting 110K followers.

view sources

Read
Eats

Is Orange The New Rosé ?

 

 

 

Will orange wine threaten the domination of rosé?

Eats

What Is Orange Wine?

Orange or amber-colored wine.

  • How: The color of wine comes from the skin of grapes. White wine is made with NO grape skins; Orange wine ferments with the skin of white wine grapes, creating an orange hue.
  • Taste: “notes of hazelnuts, almonds, citrus fruits (even oranges!) and dried fruits.”
Eats

Doubting Orange Wine?
Read This On Rosé:

“No one cared about it, no one thought about it, no one drank it…
A winemaker maybe had some leftover grapes or something that
didn’t ripen and that was what the rosé was. No one was going out
and saying, ‘I am going to make great rosé.”

Rajat Parr, sommelier, reflecting on "the pink wine" in the 1990s.
Eats

Rosé sales climbed more than 50% last year. Orange Wine may sound new, but Michelin says it's actually one of the oldest forms of wine. Although it recently reemerged as a topic du jour, folks have debated its place for years. Will you give it a try?

view sources

Read
Eats

U.S. PIZZA MUSEUM OPENS TODAY

IN CHICAGO

 

 

It’s the latest chapter in the historic pizza feud: NYC (thin crust) vs. Chicago (deep-dish).

 

Eats

U.S. Pizza Museum

  • Founded by a pizza lover & aficionado in 2015 in the form of pop-up locations nationwide.
  • Current location in Chicago’s South Loop, open until October.
  • Visitors learn the history of pizza & may buy pizza-themed products – but NO pizza.
  • Admission free.
Reserve Tickets Here
Eats

The Power of Pizza

U.S. is home to 75K+ pizzerias. 

U.S. pizza market is valued at $45B – about one-third of worldwide market.

1 in 8 Americans eat pizza on any given day.

Pizza Hut is the #1 selling pizza chain in the U.S.

Eats

NYC v. CHICAGO:
The Final Verdict

In 2011, the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia weighed in:

I do indeed like so-called ‘deep dish pizza…. But it should not be called pizza. It should be called a tomato pie. Real pizza is Neapolitan. It is thin. It is chewy and crispy, OK? 

 

Eats

Not to be outdone, a "Museum of Pizza" will open in NYC in October. It promises to be the "world's first and only immersive art experience celebrating pizza." Tickets are $35 & include a free slice.

view sources

Read
Eats

DON’T EAT THAT

From salads to cereal to crackers…food recalls have increased over the last decade. And the gov’t warns of more to come.

Reason to worry?

Eats

Why It Matters

  • Foodborne illnesses have tripled from a decade ago (CDC).
  • 1 in 6 develop a foodborne illness (i.e. E.Coli, salmonella, listeria) each year, killing 3K (CDC).

“These are the kinds of statistics you should expect in Bangladesh, not here.” 

Jayden Hanson, Center for Food Safety
Eats

Things to Know:

  • USDA regulates meat, poultry & eggs; FDA all other foods.
  • Recalls are mostly recommended by gov’t & “voluntary” done by a company OR (very seldom) required.
  • Annual USDA recalls rose 83% from 2012-2017FDA recalls are up 93% in same period, according to industry consultant, Stericycle. FDA disputes this data.
Eats

Why All the Recalls?

New technology has regulators & companies able to track down contaminants more quickly.

Industry consolidation has different products using the same supply chain, so an issue with one supplier can affect multiple products.

Eats

Important to Note

It’s not just toxic bacteria that lead to recalls. Food allergens made up nearly half (47%) of FDA food recalls & 29% of USDA recalls in the first quarter of this year.

Congress required food labels to include allergens in 2006, so if an item comes in contact with something not listed on packaging, it is recalled.

Eats

You might be surprised to learn how long it takes from the time of discovery of a problem to pulling an item off store shelves. An Inspector General investigation found it took an average 57 days. A poignant investigation takes a closer look - Visit SmartHerNews.com.

view sources

Read
Eats

It Ain’t Easy…
Being Cheesy

Whether its mac & cheese or mozzarella, cheese prices fall as America’s stock of the dairy delight hits a 100-year record-high.

Eats

Wait…Cheese Stockpiles?

  • America’s agriculture department keeps track of its cheese inventory. The gov’t has a record of cheese stockpiles since 1917!
  • Compared to last year at the same time we have 6% more cheese in America.
  • Why? Too much milk. Milk often made into cheese to preserve it. Also, summer months = less lunches packed. And tariffs.
Eats

Why It Matters

  • U.S. families: Cheese prices drop. We have plenty of cheese, but not enough demand for it.
  • U.S. dairy farmers: In addition to stockpiles, cheese exports hit by Mexico/Canada tariffs in retaliation for our tariffs on steel & aluminum. This adds more pressure on farmers who don’t make a ton of money off of cheese (margins tight).
Eats

Bigger Picture

  • Milk consumption has fallen despite the “Got Milk?” ads first introduced in the mid-1990s by the dairy industry to try to encourage consumption.
  • Americans picking other non-dairy options like almond milk.
  • Insight from one industry exec: While yogurt producers have innovated (pouches, squeeze packs), milk producers haven’t.
Eats

The price of cheese impacts the price farmers receive for milk, so it impacts the entire dairy industry. Despite current pressures, one analyst is optimistic the industry will regulate. Read more on SmartHERNews.com

view sources

Read
Eats

DINING DIPLOMACY

“Steak, corn, and cheese”

Sec. of State Mike Pompeo shared an important dinner with the North Korea delegation this week.

Sharing a meal with friends (& foes) has played a role throughout American history. Here’s a look at what was served:

Eats

Pres. Reagan & Gorbachev

Their first meal shared in Geneva in 1985 was 2 yrs before Reagan’s famous “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall” speech during Cold War.

Mrs. Reagan supervised the menu.

“a five-course dinner featuring the American flavors of lobster and avocado, complemented by California wines.”

Eats

FDR & Churchill

“…roast turkey, buttered Brussels sprouts and cranberry sauce” served as dinner aboard “The Augusta” warship in 1941

4 days after the infamous meal, ‘The Atlantic Charter’ was signed – an important defense agreement between U.S. and England in WWII.

View Menu Here:
Eats

Terrorist Leader At Pentagon Luncheon

Mere months after 9/11, in Feb. 2002, radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki had lunch at the Pentagon, as part of an outreach effort to “moderate Muslims.”

Sandwiches reportedly on menu – incl. pork (prohibited for Muslims to eat):  “Smoked turkey, Roast Beef, Smoked Ham, …Vegetarian”

Eats

The First State Dinner

  • Pres. Grant & Hawaii’s King Kalakaua, 1874 – 24 yrs. before Hawaii became U.S. territory. The King wanted to discuss trade.
  • “Nearly 30 courses, all French, were served.”
  • Started tradition of lavish dinners w/heads of state: “White House table awash in flowers, crystal decanters and a $3,000, 587-piece set of Limoges china”

 

Eats

The first state dinner of President Trump's term occurred in April 2018. Most viewed it as a victory for for the First Lady, who led the plans.

view sources

Read