Now You Know
Now You Know

Immigration Deep Dive: Visa Overstays

 

Amid the chaos and controversy about illegal immigration at the U.S. Southern Border, a closer look at an often overlooked group of people illegally in America: those who overstay their visas.

Now You Know

About The Visa Program:

  • Every year the U.S. issues more than 9M nonimmigrant visas for foreigners entering temporarily for touristic, work or educational purposes. Length of visas vary.
  • Under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), citizens of 38 countries (ex: Australia, Japan & many EU countries) are free to travel to the U.S. for up to 90 days without obtaining a visa.
Now You Know

The Visa Process:

  • Visa recipients must apply (usually in person at a U.S. embassy), provide identification & get approval by the U.S. government.
  • Those who overstay are considered “unlawfully present.”
  • Often quoted data includes ALL visa overstays, even those who eventually leave. We looked at the most recent numbers of those suspected of not leaving yet.
Now You Know

A Look At FY2017:

We don’t know how many entered illegally, but we know visa overstays outpaced border arrests.

  • More than 600K of the 52.6M who entered (via air or sea) were suspected of staying beyond the time their visa allowed.
  • More than 310K were apprehended while trying to enter illegally at a U.S. border.
Now You Know

A Closer Look:

In 2017, the overstay rate of those suspected of staying beyond the time their visa allowed was 1.15% (meaning more than 98% left under the terms of their visas).

Who were the least & most likely to overstay? Those on student or exchange visas had an overstay rate of 4.15%. The overstay rate for Visa Waiver Program countries was .51%.

Now You Know

Top 10 Countries of Visa Overstayers (FY2017)

  • Canada
  • Mexico
  • Brazil
  • China
  • Venezuela
  • UK
  • India
  • Colombia
  • Nigeria
  • France 
Now You Know

HOW DOES IT HAPPEN? A lack of information sharing & inadequate technology. A 2017 report by the federal gov't concluded that the "Department of Homeland Security IT systems don't effectively support ICE visa tracking operations." Also, some visa exit dates and extension requirements, especially for students, are vague.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

Fixer Upper For Sale

 

 

 

One of the most iconic buildings in America may now be the world’s most recognized renovations.

Now You Know

Why Is The Chrysler Building Special?

Trademark: Circular designs recall the Chrysler automobile logo (the founder of Chrysler helped build the skyscraper).

Secret Spire: The 185-foot spire was placed on the top of the building within 90 minutes to surprise competitors, earning the building’s title as world’s tallest in 1930.

Now You Know

Why Sell?

No clear answer but…

Interesting NYC Fact: *Some* owners of NYC buildings don’t own the land the building is on; they only lease it! This is the case with the Chrysler Building. The group that owns the land raised the annual prices for the owners from $7M to $32M in 2018. By 2028 it will be $40M+.

Now You Know

Who Will Buy?

Current Owners: An investment group from Abu Dhabi paid $800M for 90% in 2008. Tishman Speyer, a large New York city real estate developer that owns other famous buildings like Rockefeller Center, owns the remaining 10%.

Big Question: Can they recoup their money? No one knows the current price of this building.

Now You Know

Why is the Chrysler Building a "fixer upper"? Nearby skyscrapers with office for rent offer gyms, modern, open work spaces w/high ceilings and plenty of light. Updating a building from the 1920s is expensive and difficult. Example: The Empire State Building in a 500M renovation had to add a new antennae for wireless reception.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

SmartHER News
Week Ahead

 

 

Now You Know

Click "View Sources" for notable news events to kick off your week feeling #SmartHER. Watch our website & social media feeds for updates on these stories all week long.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

What We Know About Illegal Immigrants …

(And What We Don’t)

We don’t know *exactly* how many illegal immigrants live in the U.S. or their impact on crime, but here’s a look at three popular studies often cited by the media and politicians alike.

Now You Know

How Many Illegal Immigrants Are There?
12 Million

  • Source: Homeland Security (2018)
  • How: Using census data, DHS subtracted the legal foreign-born population from total foreign-born population

DHS says population grew to 12M in 2015 – up from 11.6M in 2010 & 10.5M in 2005.

Now You Know

How Many Illegal Immigrants Are There?
22 Million

  • Source: Researchers affiliated with Yale University (2018)
  • How: Using various federal data sources, subtracted how many leave (ex: deportations) from how many enter (ex: visa overstays)

Researchers found there were as few as 16M & as many as 29M.

Now You Know

Do Illegal Immigrants Commit More Crimes?

  • Source: Cato Institute (2017)
  • How: Examined citizenship data collected by gov’t, jails & prisons

Using the U.S. prison population, Cato found illegal immigrants are 44% LESS likely to be incarcerated vs. citizens based on incarceration rates of illegal immigrants (0.85%) & citizens (1.53%).

Now You Know

Why Data Is Limited

  • Population Estimates: a precise count of the illegal immigrant population does not exist.
  • What Defines “Criminal”: data often treats crimes & criminals equally and doesn’t take into account certain crimes are more serious than others (ex: shoplifting vs. rape). Data doesn’t break down violent crimes between citizens vs. non-citizen.
Now You Know

We don't know *exactly* how many illegal immigrants live in the U.S. and this casts a long shadow on all illegal immigration data. Also, an important reminder: the number of visa overstays (those who stay in America passed when they have permission) is higher than those apprehended at the U.S. Southern Border.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

The Tech “Creep”

Smart or Spooky?

The future of technology is on display this week in Las Vegas at the annual mega Consumer Electronic Show. Data already shows for better or worse, Americans choose to be more connected than ever.

Now You Know

“Smart Home”

Devices that connect other personal devices are on the rise. Such as:

  • A washing machine that connects to your phone or TV to alert you when your laundry is done.
  • An oven that gives you suggestions on what to cook based on your calendar & what time your schedule allows.
Now You Know

The Talking Trend

Tech is betting on a hands-free future, with your voice to operate:

  • Fridge (with an app that checks inventory while you grocery shop)
  • Even your toilet (commanding to raise or lower lid and flush)

Beyond your home, devices in cars allow control of music, navigation, & troubleshooting a warning light.

Now You Know

Who’s Tops in Voice Tech?

At least 1 in 4 of Americans already own a smart speaker.

Amazon’s Alexa is #1 with nearly half (41%) of the global smart speaker market & Google is #2 at 28%.

One-third of smart speaker owners use them less after first month.

 

Now You Know

“It’s decentralized surveillance. We’re living in a world where we’re tethered to some online service stealthily gathering our information.”

Jeff Chester, Center for Digital Democracy executive director. Companies say they are creating these technologies for your convenience, but the information they can collect helps customize their services and ads.
Now You Know

California passed a new law last year, which will likely serve as a model for other states, allowing internet users to ask what data companies have collected, why & who else has that info - starting January 2020.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

SmartHER News
Week Ahead

Now You Know

Click "view sources" for the notable news events to kick off your week feeling #SmartHer. Watch SmartHerNews.com or our social media feeds for updates on these stories all week long

view sources

Read
Now You Know

#ICYMI

“The Impossible First”

 American Colin O’Brady is the first to cross Antarctica alone.

33-year-old’s feat comes just years after doctors said he’d never walk again.

Now You Know

The Incredible Journey

  • 930+ mile trek started Nov. 3 and lasted 54 days with only one, half-day break to repair his skis.
  • Dragged 375-pound sled with a tent, sleeping bags, satellite phone & freeze-dried food.
  • Used music & podcasts to pass time, charging with solar power.
  • Final 32 hours, on Christmas Day, he powered through with no sleep to cover last 77 miles.
Now You Know

“I’m no longer the same person I was when I left on the journey, can you see it in my face? I’ve suffered, been deathly afraid, cold and alone. I’ve laughed and danced, cried tears of joy and been awestruck with love and inspiration.”

Colin O’Brady who documented his nearly entirely uphill crossing of Antarctica on Instagram.
CLICK: FOR PHOTOS
Now You Know

A Change in Course

The Yale graduate had planned to pursue a finance career, but a freak accident badly burned his legs.

Brady defied odds, made a full recovery, & won an Olympic-distance triathlon 18-mos later.

Since then, he quit his day job to focus on athletic feats, even summiting Mt. Everest.

Now You Know

In 1911, the first explorers reached the South Pole. Not until 1996-97 did a person cross the entire continent, but, unlike O'Brady, he had the help of a kite. This time, O'Brady was simultaneously competing against a British man, becoming the first by just two days!

view sources

Read
Now You Know

HISTORIC DAY

Our New Congress

Fifty years ago today, Shirley Chisholm became the first African-American congresswoman in
U.S. history.

Today, another historic moment: the swearing-in of the most diverse Congress to date.

 

Now You Know

Chisholm’s Legacy

“When I die, I want to be remembered as a woman who lived in the twentieth century and who dared to be a catalyst of change.”

Although Chisholm was both the first African-American congresswoman (representing Brooklyn, NY) and the first to run for president, she wished to be remembered for the causes she championed, like education & economic equality - not the records she set.
Now You Know

Congressional Context:

21% of the 116th Congress are people of color including 44 Latinos & the first Muslim, Somali-American & Native American congresswomen.

Increasing racial diversity is a trend. The 115th Congress sworn in 2016 also made history as *the most diverse to-date* (so did the 114th Congress) as our gov’t moves closer to reflecting U.S. demographics.

Now You Know

Why Women Reps Matter:

A record-breaking 127 women will hold 23% of the 535 seats in 116th Congress.

Previously, women never held more than 112 seats.

Six states (AZ, CA, MN, NH, NV, WA) will have all female Senators.

Now You Know

Even the partial gov't shutdown will make history today when the new Congress is sworn in. Today will mark the first time ever a government shutdown has extended into two different Congresses - the 115th and the 116th.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

‘TIS THE SEASON

The origins & evolution behind some of America’s most popular Christmas traditions.

Now You Know

CHRISTMAS TREES

The modern-day Christmas tree originated in 17th century Germany before spreading throughout Europe.

It wasn’t until the 1830s that it was introduced in the U.S. It is believed that Great Britain’s Queen Victoria‘s love of decorating the tree helped make the tradition popular on both sides of the pond.

Now You Know

SANTA CLAUS

The original Saint Nicholas, a Greek gift-giving bishop, lived during the 4th century in modern-day Turkey.

St. Nick wasn’t introduced to America until the early 19th century. The legend of Santa Claus living in the *then* fictional North Pole dates back to an 1866 depiction by a British cartoonist.

Now You Know

MISTLETOE

Although many ancient cultures associated the plant with fertility and good fortune, the tradition of kissing beneath it was born in 18th century Britain.

Today, the white-berried mistletoe that most Americans associate with Christmas is native to Mexico and grows in North American oak trees.

Now You Know

CANDY CANES

There’s no proof supporting the myth that the treat is shaped into a “J” for Jesus, but according to some, during the 17th century, a German choirmaster molded the candies into the shape of a shepherd’s staff to distract and quiet children during Christmas church services.

The red & white stripes didn’t become standard until around 1950.

Now You Know

Widely regarded as perhaps the least popular Christmas tradition, the fruitcake, dates all the way back to the Middle Ages, before becoming a Christmas staple in 16th century Europe, where it was later banned briefly for being "too rich."

view sources

Read
Now You Know

Let There Be (Christmas) Lights!

 

 

Thomas Edison created the light bulb, and his innovation lit the way for an even more colorful creation by his business partner: Christmas tree lights.

Now You Know

‘Tis The Season For Lights

Shortly after presenting his electric incandescent bulbs, Thomas Edison adorned his lab with a strands of lights during the Christmas season.

In 1882, his partner, looking for a safer alternative to candles, which caused fires, built his own set of electric lights for his Christmas tree, but due to fears about cost & safety, it took years for the trend to spread.

Now You Know

Lighting The Way Forward

  • 1882: Edward Johnson, Edison’s partner, decorated his Christmas tree with a strand of 80 red, white and blue electric lights.
  • 1895: The White House tree used electric lights for the first time.
  • 1903: Ready-to-use Christmas light sets first went on sale (est. cost $350 in today’s dollars).
  • 1930s: X-mas light sets became widely available to buy or rent.
Now You Know

Today, it's estimated the more than 150 million sets of lights are sold each year as part of the more than $6 billion dollars Americans spend on Christmas decorations annually.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

ON THE MAP

Move over Rome and Paris… Córdoba, Spain is making its mark, combining history and culture with more UNESCO World Heritage sites than any other city in the world.

Now You Know

About Cordoba

  • Pronounced: Cord-uh-ba, 45-min train ride northeast of Seville.
  • Typically tourists visit for the day, only 1M visitors last year.
  • 1,000-year-old city built to rival Constantinople or Baghdad as a legacy to the different cultures that have settled there.
  • Throughout history, it’s been occupied by Christian, Islamic & Jewish religious groups.
Now You Know

Four UNESCO Honors

  • Historic Centre of Córdoba: One of largest in Europe with Roman, Arabic, & Christian monuments.
  • Mosque-Cathedral: Unique in its architecture and for allowing Christians & Muslims to pray together.
  • Medina Azahara: Described as an “Arabic mini-Versailles.”
  • Patios Festival: Touring resident’s Islamic-style patios each Spring.
Now You Know

“To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of outstanding universal value.”

UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) on requiring selections to have a cultural, historical, or scientific significance for humanity. Gov'ts nominate sites, and, if selected, receive funding from its global body to to protect and preserve them over time. Tourism typically benefits once locations are selected, as well.
Now You Know

There are nearly 1,100 UNESCO World Heritage sites globally. Italy, with 54, has the most of any country and China is a close second with 53. The United States has 23 sites, which mostly consist of our National Parks.

view sources

Read
Now You Know

SmartHER News
Week Ahead




Now You Know

Click "view sources" for the notable news events to kick off your week feeling #SmartHER. Watch SmartHERNews.com or our social media feeds for updates on these stories all week long.   

view sources

Read