Now You Know

What We’ve Learned

The CDC’s latest report compiles what we’ve learned about COVID-19 in America from the very first case in January through the end of May.

Here’s what you should know.

Now You Know

BIG PICTURE

January 22: First case of COVID-19 confirmed in Washington State. The patient was a man who had recently traveled to Wuhan, China – the site of the first outbreak.

~ just over 4 months later ~

May 30: 1.7M+ confirmed cases.
*The CDC has *some* demographic information on an est. 1.3M cases.

 

Now You Know

BASICS

“…pandemic continues to be severe.”

  • While your risk of exposure differs on your specific community, nationwide incidents of COVID-19 is 403 cases per 100,000 people.
  • Women and men have roughly equal incidents of COVID-19.
  • However, men are more likely to have “severe outcomes” – i.e. higher rates of hospitalizations and death.
Now You Know

YOUR BODY

Those with pre-existing conditions were 6x more likely to require hospitalizations and 12x more likely to die than those without pre-existing conditions.

The most common pre-existing conditions: heart disease, diabetes and chronic lung disease.

Now You Know

AGE

Median age: 48 years

*NEW DATA*: Incidents of COVID-19 HIGHER among 40-59 year-olds (and specifically among 50-59-year-olds) than those 60-79 years old.

Overall: Highest incidents among those older than 80 and lowest in children younger than 9.

Now You Know

Symptoms / No Symptoms

Most common symptoms: 70% reported fever, cough or shortness of breath.

  • Those with no symptoms of COVID-19 = 4% of cases.
  • The CDC theorizes one of the reasons why those under 19 have dramatically lower known rates of infection may be because of unreported, “undiagnosed milder or asymptomatic illnesses.”
Now You Know

Pre-existing conditions remain a major factor for serious cases of COVID-19. Data continues to show Hispanic and Black Americans are disproportionately affected by the new coronavirus. Limits on data (less than half of all cases included info on race, fewer on health conditions) inhibit CDC's explanation as to why.

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Read

Sources

Link to CDC report: CLICK HERE

LEARN MORE:

Here’s the background on Patient Zero: CLICK HERE

Looking Back: America’s First 100 Days With Covid-19: CLICK HERE