Federick Douglass Scrapbook

April 2, 2021
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One of the most famous men in American history had private family scrapbooks you will soon see for yourself.

The amazing story of the Frederick Douglass collection.

Frederick Douglass

  • Born into slavery 1818; escaped to Massachusetts as a young man.
  • Self-educated, he became a powerful writer, journalist, and speaker.
  • One of the most significant abolitionists in American history.
  • Publisher of “The North Star,” an anti-slavery newspaper published in New York and read around the world.
  • The most-photographed American of any race in the 19th century.

The Scrapbooks

  • 9 private family scrapbooks of articles, photographs, personal letters arranged by Douglass’ three sons in the years after the Civil War, referred to as “the most extraordinary private collection of Douglass manuscript material in the world.”
  • Yale University recently acquired the collection, says will put the contents online for all to see (and read) first-hand.
“Scholars, researchers, students and the world should have access to it.”

Dr. Walter Evans, a retired surgeon, is a leading private collector of African-American art, writing, and artifacts. He owned the collection before Yale and says of Douglass: “You can’t just say he was an editor or just an abolitionist or just a politician because he was just so much more than that.” Douglass inspired many with his personal story, but also became a leading activist before, during & after the Civil War.

A historian describes Douglass’ famous July 5, 1852 speech on American independence: “He rips the throats out of his audience, before lifting them up at the end. He says ‘It’s not quite too late. Your nation is still young, still malleable. It’s still possible to save yourselves.’” — Read it:

Frederick Douglass: “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?,”: CLICK HERE

The announcement from YALE

Read More: Yale Library To Release Large Collection Of Materials From Frederick Douglass:

Frederick Douglass Seen UpClose

by Jenna Lee,

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