Health

Aspirin
Mouthwash
Baby Shampoo

Are these commonly-found household items part of your defense against COVID-19?

What the studies say…

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Mouthwash & Shampoo

  • Penn State College of Medicine researchers placed samples of a similar human coronavirus – *not COVID-19* – in mouthwashes (ex: Listerine), saline nasal rinses, and a 1% baby shampoo solution (used as nasal rinse) for 30-second, 1-min & 2-min intervals.
  • Next they diluted the results, placed the results in contact with cultivated human cells, and waited a few days to measure how much of the virus was inactivated.
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RESULTS

  • 1% baby shampoo solution nasal rinse: Inactivated more than 99.9% of the human coronavirus tested after 2 min.
  • Mouthwashes: Many inactivated between 90% and  99.9% of the human coronavirus tested after 30 seconds – some took longer than 30 seconds.
  • Saline nasal rinses: No impact.
  • NOTE: Researchers could not use actual COVID-19 due to issues w/availability, safety & expense.
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“While we wait for a vaccine to be developed, methods to reduce transmission are needed… The products we tested are readily available and often already part of people’s daily routines.”

Penn State study leader, distinguished prof. of microbiology and immunology, Craig Meyers. He admits "mouthwash won't cure COVID-19" but says "even if the use of these solutions could reduce transmission by 50%, it would have a major impact" and that more research on nasal and oral rinses is needed.
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FYI: Listerine Says

“Listerine® Antiseptic mouthwash is not clinically proven to kill the coronavirus that causes COVID-19… To date, the available data is not sufficient to support a conclusion that the use of Listerine® Antiseptic or mouthwashes could be helpful against coronavirus as further research is needed.”

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Aspirin

  • Univ. of Maryland researchers reviewed the medical records of 400+ former COVID-19 patients from four East Coast hospitals. About a quarter took daily low-dose aspirin either right before or right after being admitted.
  • RESULTS: Daily low-dose aspirin was *associated* with a 43% lower risk of ICU admission, a 44% lower risk of being put on a ventilator, & a 47% lower risk of death while admitted.
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“If our finding is confirmed, it would make aspirin the first widely available, over-the-counter medication to reduce mortality in COVID-19 patients.”

University of Maryland study leader, asst. professor of anesthesiology, Jonathan Chow. The study's co-author said aspirin's blood-thinning effects help prevent blood clots and other cardiovascular problems, which can be particularly devastating for COVID-19 patients, but says patients must consult with their doctor before taking aspirin.
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All of the studies' researchers agree that while the results are promising as a starting point, people should continue to follow the preventive measures issued by federal, state, and local health officials, including mask wearing, frequent handwashing, and maintaining social distance.

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