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CASHING IN…?

The NCAA’s new proposal for potentially paying student-athletes:

Why some call it progressive and others call it phony.

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QUICK CHEAT SHEET

NCAA: Largest governing body in college sports.

College sports = BIG money for schools, coaches and for the NCAA (the nonprofit topped $1 billion in revenue for first time in 2017).

Criticism: Only people NOT making $$ off college sports seem to be the student-athletes themselves.

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THE BACKSTORY

  • Current NCAA rules ban student-athletes from profiting financially off their name, likeness, or image (ex: endorsement deals).
  • Recently, California became the first state to enact a law which will allow college athletes to profit off their name, likeness, or image, forcing the issue to the forefront.
  • At least 10 states introduced similar bills or will soon do so.
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The BIG News

  • For the first time, the NCAA says it will allow student-athletes to profit from their “name, image and likeness.”
  • The NCAA directed its divisions (Div I-III) to “consider” updating their rules no later than 2021, but offered little other specifics. That’s important since rules must be set on a national (not division or state-by-state) level.
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“I don’t see any significant movement towards players having actual rights here. What (the NCAA) really means is ‘severely limited and regulated’ (changes) with very little consequence and benefit to the players.”

ESPN college basketball analyst Jay Bilas. The part-time lawyer and former collegiate athlete says the NCAA's announcement is lip-service and provides no guidance for real change.
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But Wait…Don’t Athletes Get “Paid” in Scholarships?

Full-rides are exceptionally rare.

  • 480,000 student athletes participate in the NCAA.
  • Est. 300,000 play in Div. I or II schools, eligible for scholarships.
  • About 50% of Div I or II student-athletes receive some type of athletic scholarships worth approximately $2.7B total.
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Something To Consider

“Hopefully, there’s a way that players can get compensated legally that makes cheating less appealing, or just improves their experience while they’re here. These guys don’t have time for a part-time job, in-season, out-of-season. They’re here 11 months with us, working around the clock. So, I’m all for it.”

UConn Basketball coach Dan Hurley
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With less than 2% of college athletes "going pro," their college careers grant them a finite amount of time to profit from their athletic abilities. Critics say allowing compensation turns student-athletes into employees rather than students, creating a slippery slope to not prioritize education. What do you think?

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