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A Taste of Autumn

It’s officially Fall. Time to bring on pumpkin spice, well, everything. 

But don’t let those tastebuds fool you, there’s no pumpkin in that pumpkin spice.

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How Did We Get Here?

First pumpkin spice reference dates back to 1796, but it was McCormick & Co. who brought it to store shelves in 1934.

McCormick uses cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg & allspice – not pumpkin.

Starbucks debuted its pumpkin spice latte in 2003, which is credited for the craze as we know it today.

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“It represents a sense of goodness, natural abundance and old values that people think are good.”

Cindy Ott, author of “Pumpkin: The Curious History of an American Icon," on how Americans have used pumpkin pie & the spices in it to maintain connections to nature and our country's beginnings. America is the only country in the world that consumes pumpkin as a seasonal food or drink.
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Peak Pumpkin Spice?

  • Americans spent $500M on pumpkin-flavored food in the last year, a new all-time high & up 15% vs. 2017.
  •  In 2005, pumpkin-flavored items were on 6% of U.S. restaurant menus. By 2015, the number grew to 14.5%, with the most in the northeast.
  • Fastest growing pumpkin-spiced product? Dog food. Seriously.
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Starbuck's sprang forward this fall, debuting its famed pumpkin spice latte in late August. The #PSL drink, now in its 15th year, does include actual pumpkin puree and even has its own Twitter account (@TheRealPSL) boasting 110K followers.

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