Scottie Scheffler Wins The Masters

April 15, 2024
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… winning this golf tournament does not change my identity. My identity is secure, and I cannot — cannot emphasize that enough.

Golfer Scottie Scheffler after winning the Masters.

What To Know: The 27-year-old Texan established himself as the current best golfer in the world on Sunday, winning his second Masters in the past three years. During a post-win press conference, Scheffler reflected on his faith, saying “I have been given a gift of this talent, and I use it for God’s glory.”

He also discussed how becoming a father will soon change his priorities: “My son or daughter will now be the main priority, along with my wife, so golf will now be probably fourth in line. But I still love competing. I don’t plan on taking my eye off the ball anytime soon …” 

Read More: The inevitability of Scottie Scheffler winning the 2024 Masters (ESPN)

More highlights from his presser:

Q. Speaking about your faith there, could you just tell us a bit about how much it features in your head when you’re actually out there on the course? Does it help you cope with the sort of vicissitudes of the wind and things like that, bad breaks?

SCOTTIE SCHEFFLER: Yeah, I mean, I believe that today’s plans were already laid out many years ago, and I could do nothing to mess up those plans. I have been given a gift of this talent, and I use it for God’s glory. That’s pretty much it.

So when I’m out there, I try to compete to the best of my abilities. Like I said, I really want to win. I feel like that’s how I was designed. I’ve been that way since I was a young kid. That’s always been a part of me, and I don’t think that should be going away anytime soon. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that either.

At the end of the day, like I said, my identity is secure already, and I get to come out here and compete, have fun, enjoy it; and then at the end of the day, win or lose, my identity is secure.

Q. How much do you struggle with the idea of discontentment, of needing — whether it’s more wins, more money, more fame to be satisfied, and when do you find yourself most content?

SCOTTIE SCHEFFLER: Gosh, that’s a good question. I feel like playing professional golf is an endlessly not satisfying career. For instance, in my head, all I can think about right now is getting home. I’m not thinking about the tournament. I’m not thinking about the green jacket. I’m trying to answer your questions and I’m trying to get home.

I wish — I wish I could soak this in a little bit more. Maybe I will tonight when I get home. But at the end of the day, I think that’s what the human heart does. You always want more, and I think you have to fight those things and focus on what’s good.

Because, like I said, winning this golf tournament does not change my identity. My identity is secure, and I cannot — cannot emphasize that enough.

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by Emily Hooker, based in Texas

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